Sleuthing Melodies...

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This is not your typical video and if you don't go through the process with me a few times you might miss a lot. At first, you'll probably think you can't do this but I promise that you can and this is how it is done.

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118 Comments

  • Jessica M. Delia

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Griff-I watch all of your videos and they are all fantastic. This one is, by far, the best! And that is really saying something! Thanks for all the hours of excellent instruction!

    • Andy Morton

      Reply Reply July 15, 2017

      G…Please conside shooting in 4K 50 or 60 FPS so that your content lasts for decades! You can or Youtube can downgrade to 1080p for economics for now.

    • PAUL

      Reply Reply July 15, 2017

      I tried to watch the whole video got to much of what i learn by ear. this scale was the first i learned. i learned the solo in White Room by Cream by ear. all the major and this music therory, just never ever got it. a lot of those songs , i played way back in the 80’s in a band. and learned them by ear had the cords, but the solos i did not have tabs, music, can’t read or write.
      Your Blues dvd’s helped me a lot. when i was young. i Listened to Bob Dylan. he played so much blues back in the 60’s even clapton played the blues. Hendrix got his insperation from the blues ! so any one that is aching here for the blues, needs to learn theses style songs. with out the delta blues, we would never had Jerry lee , or Chuck Berry, and others from the 50’s.
      TANKS, GRIFF.

    • Scott

      Reply Reply July 17, 2017

      You say that “Still Got the Blues” is in “C” but the tune doesn’t have a “happy sound” to it so I would guess that it is in Am (relative minor of C). Do modes apply to minor scales?

      I realize that the notes that make up the Am scale are the same as the C major scale and that all of the modes of Am (if that is a proper way to look at this?) would have the same notes as all of the modes of C major, it just depends upon which root or most important note of the scale we choose to start with. Am I thinking about this the right way?

      • Griff

        Reply Reply July 17, 2017

        Yes, you are thinking about it exactly right. We’ll talk more about that in an upcoming video, but you’re on the right track.

        • William

          Reply Reply July 25, 2017

          Griff,

          I too thought Am was a logical key as well especially when the E chord acts so much like a dominant chord pulling the ear back to the Am. Just my observation

        • Brad

          Reply Reply March 26, 2019

          How do we know it is in a- aeolian? Could it be seen as d- dorian? Which works, or do they both? Lovely song – evocative!

    • Jim Barrett

      Reply Reply June 4, 2019

      Wow!
      This is a really good summation,
      If someone wants to be able to play these great melodic songs you just
      gave them the “key” (pun intended).
      This is the kind of stuff you sort of know
      if you stick around long enough but you’ve put it in an easy to follow presentation.

      This is really valuable thanks a lot

      • Kevin O’Sullivan

        Reply Reply April 30, 2020

        I haven’t commented for a while but it needs to be said. You are a brilliant teacher Griff.
        You manage to bring more and more theory into your videos without bamboozling us or boring us into tuning out – and the theory, bit by bit, begins to stick and more importantly make sense.
        Best guitar teacher ever – no question. Thank you Griff.

  • Cynicure

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Hi Griff and thanks for the lesson. I’ll have to watch through this a few more times to ‘soak up all the juice’…

    I think it might be very helpful if you were to do a video on how the modes correspond to the ‘blues boxes’ or scales… Ie. which mode relates to which scale/box…

    Rock on!

  • Mark a Wales uk

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Cheers Griff
    For the lesson a few penny’s dropped watching this will watch a few more times
    I was going over the last video on modes when you sent this one I’m sure you know
    What I’m working on but that’s a sign of a good teacher they know what you need to
    Work on 😎🎶

  • BignJames

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    This video just made a lot of things come together for me. Information I had, but lacked application for, like the Standard Harmony Rule.Thanks, Griff!

  • Jerry Brock

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    I am one of those I just can’t do it people. I still remember one of my elementary school teachers would always tell us ” can’t never could ” and that sticks in my mind, but now at 50 years old I’m starting to tell myself maybe I’m just a rythm player. My music teacher gave me the modes 27 years ago when I was taking lessons, but never really explained why I needed them. I played through them a few times and then put them away. Now I’m thinking maybe it’s time to pull those back out and go over them again. I too am tone deaf ( that’s what the old folks called it when I was growing up ) I can sing along with the radio or someone else and people say ” oh you have a great voice ” , but let me sing by myself and it’s ” don’t quit your day job”. You are an awesome teacher. I wish I could have found someone like you 30 years ago, I believe I would be in a totally different place. Music was all I ever really cared about as a child and who knows maybe one day I may still be able to walk out on that stage. Probably with a little assistance, but it would still be a dream come true. Thank you and keep up the good work.

    • Ian

      Reply Reply July 17, 2017

      It’s all about ‘intervals’ ?

  • Tim

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    At last–the veil removed from my eyes. Something previously inscrutable, now made so clear. This is the mark of a fine teacher. As always, thank you, Griff.

  • mike zeoli

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Griff , I really enjoyed this lesson . It gives me a better perspective of how to break down a song . Thank you , Mike Z.

  • Ronald L Mitchell

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    So thats what that instructer was trying to explain to me 5 years ago and he plays in a fairly good local band. needless to say I dumped him cause i was looking for you. Your still the one that can get through to me

    Thanks
    Griff

  • Kirk Bauer

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Griff, This is absolutely THE best lesson to date IMHO. You have lifted the fog. I think I have learned more in this one lesson, than any other three lessons combined. You sir, are a master teacher. From all of us out here, I thank you profusely.

  • Brian Burke

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Great, Griff. Extremely valuable. Can’t wait for the next one. So glad you excluded the Blues at the end, cuz I was thinking, but what about when the E7 is the I? Everything fell into place. B

  • Ron

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Griff, great stuff! I wish I would have known this stuff 50 years ago when I first started playing it would have made learning songs a lot easier!
    Howdo I find the previous video to learn about the modes?

  • Norm

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    This is the first lesson on modes that I’ve actually understood. Really good lesson thank you.

  • Colin

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    You have the capacity to pick u the fragments that are alone and bring them together congruently for me to advance my learning. Little by little the keyboard is becoming more familiar and friendly to me. Thanks for your lessons and your ability to pickup the fragments and string them together for meaning and music for me.

  • Jim

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Great stuff Griff. Love it.

    Thanks.

  • Érika

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Very hawsome! So well explained! Thank you

  • daveyjoe

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Griff…you are a regular Sherlock Holmes! This is excellent stuff for us to apply immediately! Thanks much Griff.

  • Ed

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Thanks again, Griff – Please keep it up.

  • Eric Petersen

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Most excellent – and it’s actually pretty simple! Could you discuss-demonstrate a few “tone center” examples? Thanks

  • matt

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Griff,
    Loved it. Very,very informative. Thanks a lot. Looking forward to next lesson.
    Matt.

  • just joe

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    I found you by accident but you are most helpful . i understand what you are saying and its a great help. Thanks a Lot.

  • Straydawg

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Thanks for these lessons, Griff. I feel a good dose of theory along with the empirical really helps round out a musician’s education. Can’t wait for the next one. BTW…it’s prolly no coincidence that Neal Schon plays so melodically, having traded licks with Carlos Santana at the ripe old age of 16 on classic albums like Abraxis. Keep ’em comin’, Brother!

  • Jeff

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Do I sense a new course coming soon?

  • Grady

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Thanks for the lessons, Griff. I have nearly all of your programs,which have helped me tremendously. I hope you will put together a program that would include the material you just presented because I would surely buy it. Being a teacher myself, I can appriciate your approach to conveying a difficult concept. You did a great job ( A+).

  • Sonny

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    That looks like a lot of fun. Thanks for the lesson, Griff.

  • Bobby G

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Hi Griff! I’ve been working my way through your “Guitar Theory Made Useful” course, and this video totally helps reinforce the concepts around chapter 13 – thanks! Unfortunately I’m stumped in one of the first songs I tried to figure out – hoping you can explain what’s going on. The song is Michaela Rae’s cover of “Green Onions.” The chords are E, D, and A – so the key is clearly A. The lead starts and focuses on E – so E Mixolydian, right? Nope. The second note in the lead isn’t even in the scale, it’s a G. Any idea what’s going on here?

    BTW – your videos and courses have been super helpful. Keep up the great work!

    • Griff

      Reply Reply July 16, 2017

      That says blues scale to me…. try E minor blues scale, or E mixolydian with the b3 (G) and we’ll talk more about that soon. I don’t know that version but I’ll look into it.

      • Griff

        Reply Reply July 16, 2017

        Even though she’s going through E,G, and A repeatedly, they are all a “riff” over the E chord. She then goes to A, C, and D for the IV chord “riff” and finally B, D and E as the V chord “riff.”

        Basically, it’s a blues in E so you could use E mixolydian or E blues as I suspected.

        • Bobby G

          Reply Reply July 17, 2017

          Hi Griff,

          Thanks so much for checking that out. The chord pattern had me thrown, but I now see how they are just “riffs” within a larger blues pattern. Super helpful!

          Cheers,

          Bob

  • Richard M Stuber

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Wonderful information for a 73-year-old beginner. please keep it up. Lots of information.

  • AlanBGo

    Reply Reply July 15, 2017

    Ahh, the light bulb has been illuminated! Excellent and thanks. ✌

  • Bill

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Been playing for 55 years. Your explanation of modes.. right on.

  • Ray (UK)

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Nice one Griff. I found this very easy to get along with as, this is the way I have been finding my melodies for years. I can’t read music but I CAN hum a tune and like you’ve said before, if you can hum it, you can play it. I’ve stumbled my way through melodies, riffs and licks for years, doing it all by ear. Your lessons have taught me the theory that I have been lacking and a much quicker and knowledgeable route to licks, riffs n melodies, which makes my guitar playing so much more satisfying. Another great lesson. Thanks Griff. Ray (UK).

  • Ed

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Pearls absolute pearls of knowledge, thanks Griff

  • Paul

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Had set aside some practice time today for SMB…..then watched these two recent videos on modes….Wow , sure have some stuff to learn now. Think I’ll have to give up my day job to keep up with all the lessons. Thanks for the sussinct explanation of modes Griff.

  • Michael K

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    This, along with yesterday’s lesson on modes, is the most informative lesson on the web. You doing this lesson makes me even happier that I spent my money on Blues Guitar Unleased and the Little Wing Lesson, this is a tremendous BONUS lesson. I am looking forward to more, you are a fantastic teacher. Thank you so much.

  • Michael K

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    P.S. Thanks, this lesson is the answer to my question from yesterday.

  • Bob S

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Hi Griff, This & the last lesson covering modes have hands down made more of the missing link lights come on for me than having taken about a decade of weekly jazz lessons from a conservatory trained guitarist had done for me previously. Not sure I’ll be instantly improvising my way around every tune I’ve played all these years but in less than an hour you’ve made a lot of music make a whole lotta sense. Working my way through BGU 2.0 & the Slow Blues Solo courses makes me really curious as to how you’ll tie together using the myxolidian mode over blues tunes to solidify that approach as well. Bravo & thank you ever so much for being such a spectacular teacher in the most revered sense of the word. I’m in awe. No other way to put it. Bob

  • Dave AKA Bluewater

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    This is PURE GOLD!

    Yesterday I watched and listened to the two Videos “The Notes In Between” and “Sleuthing Melodies…”
    Today then I was able to quickly get to the “Notes in between” on a two chord vamp B to A.

    B and A whole step apart. Ah Key of E.
    The sound of the vamp was “centered” on B. Ok B is the five of the major scale.
    Ok the mode is Mixolydian built on the fifth of the scale.

    Nailed it. I suddenly sounded like a pro.

    If anyone is interested search for “Allman Brothers Style Backing Track in B” on YouTube and be amazed.

  • John Anthony

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    This video plus the last video equal solid gold. Finally Neil Young’s “Like a Hurricane” makes sense! I’ve spent years wondering why the lead guitar sounded like it was playing C when none of the chords used during the musical jam was a C. Aeolian maybe? Haha! I perhaps can die a happy man. Thank you, Griff. – John

  • tony

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Ijust got one word SUPER THXS

  • Terence Jones

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    At last an example of the application of modes, so often missing from most other tutorials. You’ve cracked it again Sir Griff. Respect. Hope there’s a lot more where that came from. Many thanks.

  • steven siegel

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    A very good people exercise in training your ears to listen.

  • John Sheehan

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Really enjoyed this. My allergy to modes is diminishing in a major way!

    • Griff

      Reply Reply July 16, 2017

      I hope the pun was intentional… Good one!

  • Richard Haley

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Griff-as a long time student of yours and a former 50+ years television executive I must say that your passion for music is easy to see. I have taken several of your courses and learned and was motivated to learn.
    But strictly from video perspective you didn’t play anything till 6.30 in. Of we did that in news there would be no audience. Please let me again say what a great teacher and communicator you are I have suffered a lifetime learning disabilities and in business learned to find a different way of understanding it. So the video was like watching 4 years of calculus and algebra condensed into 3min on virtual googles.
    I think it sucked…. But for a more normal person it was probably the best.
    Bigric

  • Ed

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Hi Griff,

    I have blues guitar unleashed and for me as a student I feel like you take too long to get to the point in your instruction. Everyone learns differently and you have plenty of fans so I’m sure your instruction methods just aren’t for me.

  • Barry

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Hi Griff. Thank you for all your lessons in the past and I enjoyed them for a lot of years but I hardly ever pick up my guitar now. I’m 76 years old and can’t seem to get motivated anymore. Apart from that I’ve got atheritis in my hands and can’t handle the fret like I would like to. Thank you Griff for all of your emails and wish you and yours happy and health in the future. Barry. U.K.

  • Leanne

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    I, on the other hand, have NO IDEA what you are talking about. Have some kind of block and my ears/eyes glaze over as soon as the lingo begins.

  • Ron

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Wonderful, perfectly taught. This and the lesson preceding it. Never seen it explained better. Thanks.

  • Brian Waddell

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Thanks Griff, I am finding the further I go the less I know, please keep sending these lessons, I probably would have fallen by the way side a ling time ago if your e-mails would have stopped.

  • Robert Levesque

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    That was great. One of your best. The 2, 3 and 4, 5 idea really helps.

  • John

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    You do not want to miss this video!!!

  • Gary Hunt

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    Any time you can break theory in easy hands on simple terms that is always a hit
    Well done

  • Dennis

    Reply Reply July 16, 2017

    My best take away is nearly a mnemonic:
    1,3,5: Major
    2,4,6 Minor.
    I have tripped over that for years.
    Thanks

    • MarkInTheGardens

      Reply Reply July 24, 2017

      Hey Dennis. Isn’t it: 1, 4, 5 = major chords; 2, 3, 6 = minor chords? Just checking.

  • Rox (Roxy)

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    Griff, you are the greatest. I have CRGU and most of your other courses as well. I appreciate the lessons you send us CRGUers and BGUers.
    You have done so much to inspire me.
    This lesson was great. I aspire to play like Santana. I will always play like me, in my own “voice” but I hope to become more fluid in my playing.
    I work at it and I can dream of getting there. You, Griff are already there and you are helping me in my goals!
    Thanks Griff!

  • David Munson

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    Nice video. I’ve used this idea for years uncovering the song key. You are right. Hum the melody. It also helps you sing in key. I learned if I could sing the solo, I could play it. Helped me develope a usable falsetto. Keep these coming, love them.

  • David

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    Nice video. I’ve used this idea for years uncovering the song key. You are right. Hum the melody. It also helps you sing in key. I learned if I could sing the solo, I could play it. Helped me develope a usable falsetto. Keep these coming, love them.

  • Dan

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    Hi,Griff. Loved the video.You mentioned your overdrive pedal,How do you match your tones to the song? Part of your research or do you just use tones that you like to use in everyday playing for all songs. Thanks,Dan

  • Jeffrey G

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    Griff, very good video, honest & true you are! Some great knowlege of the way songs go! Playing around until you find the right notes! Thanks!

  • Bernard May

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    I agree with Paul’s comments, I am a completely by ear player and I do not analyse anything, I just seem to know a lot of the stuff from long experience and kind of instinct. Your stuff is very interesting especially for people that consider themselves as “tone deaf”! I can seem to play most things by copying but I have to say I do not have an electric guitar so cannot get the sound you do Griff! Also I do not have the dexterity of speedy playing! BTW, one of your examples with a backing track reminded me of Black Magic Woman by Santana et.al. But all in all very informative video Griff!

  • bryan bernas

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    Thanks Griff real interesting video .

  • Rick

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    You have just answered soooo many questions for me! thanks. Have you ever thought about doing a video about arpeggios and how melodies can live inside and
    around them?

  • Kevin

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    Well Griff – that was a total mind blast which I’ll have to visit again & again. So many pieces falling into place all at once! I watched & listened totally engrossed – what an excellent lesson. Thank you so much. Now I’m off to practice
    Cheers
    Kevin

  • Brian Foster

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    *Click* Hey Griff, I have been taking lessons for a couple of years now, filling in the musical gaps and theory. I have strummed the guitar for decades (John Denver, Cat Stevens, etc), but now working on learning the fretboard and how to play melodies or blues. I’m a good musician from choral singing, tenor sax, and even opera chorus for a dozen years. Your lessons are always helpful. BUT, this one I believe has finally connected some dots for me in a way that should help me really integrate the pieces of scales, chords, note names, scale degrees and associated chords, etc. Those couple of “tricks” made me see/hear the structure in newly interconnected way. Wow, thank you for helping a big chunk of theory click. I’ll be sharing this one with my guitar teacher and choosing some new songs to apply these techniques.

  • Larry Geibel

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    This was nice to see how you breakdown the root and the fine the lead inside the scale. Over the last couple of years the scales have be the source to get a quick hand on the melodies. Thanks for the tricks and clues.

  • Chris Coughlan

    Reply Reply July 17, 2017

    Methinks a touch of insecurity from your email over whether this set of videos would work? You had nothing to worry about. You are an outstanding teacher and deserving of all the praise. You’ve just made me realise I’ve been mixing and matching bits of scales for years without knowing it. The whole subject of modes was too daunting for me and you have shown that it isn’t. Good for you Griff.

  • Dave

    Reply Reply July 18, 2017

    Hi Griff, a really great group of teaching videos you’ve got going here. It’s very timely for me because I’ve been trying to analyze the song Married to the Blues by The Norton’s. Do the rules you discuss only apply to Major scales because I think Married to the Blues is in Bm. The chord progression is Bm, A, Em, F#7.

  • Ken

    Reply Reply July 18, 2017

    Great video, Griff! I had wondered about exactly what you described here as to know the key
    based on major chords and you put it in a crystal clear explanation. Absolutely invaluable information.
    You are an amazing guitar teacher, and from what I can tell, a really good all around guy.
    wish we had more like you in this World… filled with so much deceit, evil, meanness, and hypocrisy.
    People like you who help other people, not harm them. I sincerely thank you for all your
    time and efforts to make and send out your teaching videos.

  • Tom

    Reply Reply July 18, 2017

    Excellent theory review, thanks. I hadn’t gone through that concept in a while.

  • Michael Chappell

    Reply Reply July 18, 2017

    Hey Griff, Great lesson as always. I have downloaded and watched it. .I will get to it once I progress a lot more with the BGU Courses I am going through but it is certainly easy to follow you..
    Michael-Sydney-Australia July 2017.

  • Paul

    Reply Reply July 18, 2017

    Griff, Still got the Blues is one of may favorite songs and I like to play it on both the acoustic and the electric. I have the Gary Moore Still Got the Blues song book and it’s also in another Blues song book I have. Both versions start with: Dm7, Dm7/G, Cmaj7 etc. So I play it Dm7, Dm7(with G base), Cmaj7 etc. In your video you discuss playing Dm7 and then playing G7? So? What? I’ve got the rhythm down pretty well playing Dm7/G. I’d like to play this tune correct and I thought I was. Can you talk about why the books have Dm7/G and yet you and possibly Gary play a G7?

    • Jeremy

      Reply Reply July 22, 2017

      You are playing it correctly. Great question, I’m no expert, but definitely take into account the whole progression – also G being the lowest note, it can be looked as an altered G chord – and so part of the G(dom)7 family. I play G7 (it’s easy) and it was likely easier for Grif to demo it showing the whole key with all its correct ‘related’ chords. This, (more than one way of looking at the exact same thing), is actually what makes music so interesting and also why that particular song sounds as though it wanders slowly all around the key. I’ll bet it’s why Gary used it exactly that way, so the listener wasn’t quite sure where it was going – until we finally get to the Am chord – then you know. As Grif details, Gary also used the E7 chord, so he could use the scale Grif is demonstrating to get a different yet fantastic sound. It’s a great song and those two ‘strange’ chords are just one of the reasons why it sounds so beautiful, sad, mysterious or ‘haunting’. It’s why he’s one of the great blues artists and why this is one of the great blues songs and also, why this guy is one of the great teachers! I’m sure your playing and thinking would benefit from more of this info, im also sure it’s why Grif is doing this latest course – check out the BGU forums, they’ll really help you a lot more than I could. There really is no end to the blues – it’s why we’ve still got them…

  • Michael Hechler

    Reply Reply July 19, 2017

    Thanks Griff (Teach), that will take some practice, but the fun is in the journey 🙂

  • Andy

    Reply Reply July 19, 2017

    These ‘modal type’ lessons are so good I am lost for words.Griff,there are not enough superlatives to do these lessons justice-Awesome;astonishing etc.Thankyou also does not do you justice but is all I got!

    Best regards andy(U.K.)

  • Ken Reimer

    Reply Reply July 20, 2017

    Thanks for all the videos Griff, they are all very helpful.

  • Chris Byrne

    Reply Reply July 20, 2017

    This set of videos finally explained what modes are, how to use them while playing, and this “sleuthing” one in particular is amazing. Thank you.

  • Lyn

    Reply Reply July 22, 2017

    Great videos as always. Been practicing my modes but I came across one progression and I’m stuck as to what mode is the starting point. The progression is as follows Em C G D. I can play along using Em pentatonic scale and its positions but from that progression how do I determine a starting point for which mode to use if that makes sense?
    Many thanks,
    Lyn

  • charles alvarado

    Reply Reply July 23, 2017

    its all Greek to me but i am gonna give it a good try

  • MarkInTheGardens

    Reply Reply July 24, 2017

    Hey Griff. I’ve got a tune I’m working on with another guy that he mostly wrote. It’s basically Em to Amaj to Em to B7. Now according to your rules, would that be in the key of E, even though it uses Em? Maybe it’s just “different”? You spoke about the 1, 4 & 5 being major and 2, 3 & 6 being minor in a major scale, How does that work in minor keys? Could this song be in a minor key? Thoughts?

  • Chief Rick

    Reply Reply November 26, 2017

    Thanks, Griff. This video will save me a lot of time in the future. But if you don’t run into many diminished chords, I guess you don’t mess with jazz much. 🙂

  • Keith Plimmer

    Reply Reply February 8, 2019

    This is by far the most useful video and allows you to learn any song and “play by ear”. I cannot wait for the “Blues” version!! Play on Griff!!

  • Graham

    Reply Reply February 13, 2019

    Fabulous Griff. I just put down an old Chubby Checker song “20 Miles”. Ready for a reunion with some old mates. Again and again thanks heaps.

  • Mark Smith

    Reply Reply February 14, 2019

    Griff you never stop amazing me this video was so helpful.Taking this lesson answered so many questions as to how to figure out a song,Thanks… Mark S

  • Norm Blackmore

    Reply Reply February 18, 2019

    Griff, great video, thanks. But maybe rules are made to be broken (or maybe not).
    I’m playing “You Won’t See Me” by Lennon/McCartney. While playing it, I felt that it sounded like the Key of G, but maybe no.
    The main chords are G, A, & C (yes C, not D)
    G & A are a whole step apart, therefore they must be the IV & V chords. So, if A is the V chord, then C must be the VII chord.
    Hey, now you have seen it; a rock song with a VII major chord Apparently, this song is in the Key of D, which would make sense, since we have G & A,
    however, the D Major Chord never appears in the song at all. This sounds like a straight forward rock song, not some weirdo Jazz thing,
    So what gives? I’m confused. Can you enlighten me.
    Thanks in advance.
    Norm

  • Norm Blackmore

    Reply Reply February 19, 2019

    Griff, here is another song I’ve been playing lately. “Nobody Loves You” by John Lennon. It’is in the Key of D.
    The main chords are D, G, & E (yes E, not A). It does have a Bm and A7 later in the chorus, but the Harmony rule would have Em, not E (major)
    Did the Beatles have their own set of Harmony rules? (LOL)
    Norm

  • Andy

    Reply Reply March 9, 2019

    Many thanks for this Griff – a fascinating lesson and so useful. I have struggled previously to see how the modes fit into the structure of these songs and also the major, minor etc chords related to the diatonic scale. This key should unlock the door to working out and playing some of these great melodies. Really inspiring!
    Every good wish, Andy (in the UK)

  • Jameel

    Reply Reply March 10, 2019

    THANK YOU for condensing years of your study and experience into 30 minutes. I’m gonna have to watch it again many times, but what an eye opener! I bought your BGU course a while back and it was killer, just like your videos. Thanks again for your insights and generosity, bro. You rock!

  • Tom

    Reply Reply March 10, 2019

    Hey Griff, I enjoy these Classic Rock vids , but you don’t have enough of them. What do ya say that you have a subscription, much like your Blues Guitar lessons, that come in the e-mail ??? I’d sign up for those, too, if you’d offer them.

  • Chaplain Ed

    Reply Reply March 27, 2019

    What a gold mine of teaching! Your generosity in sharing your hard earned knowledge is overwhelming Griff. Most teachers would never “give away” the nuggets that you share with us. I for one am extremely grateful. God bless brother.

  • Gordon

    Reply Reply April 3, 2019

    These last two videos have been perhaps the most enlightening ones I have seen! So many of my questions about some guitar solos were answered! While i know the modes, I never clearly understood them!
    Thanks for being such a great teacher and guitar player!

  • Barry

    Reply Reply October 3, 2019

    OUTSTANDING lesson!

    I’m a 40 year bass player, who’s had formal music training, using your courses to learn guitar. I’ve never seen this in a formal course, and I’ve never seen it described so simply in a book. My theory classes have included modes, scales, and ear training, but none have ever hit me over the head like this.

    Griff, you have a gift for teaching. Thank you!

  • Ken M

    Reply Reply April 29, 2020

    Thank you so much for this lesson ! I took private guitar lessons a couple of years ago “ along with many of your courses “ and my teacher started off with scales and then modes etc. He discussed
    The way to figure out what key a song is written in . But you have really made it so simple to figure those things out and have sped up my learning curve ! You make it fun and not so grooling to figure out the location and mode of most of my favorite songs. It’s amazing to me some people can explain what others are trying to teach and make so simple . My friend you have that gift !!

  • Dave Kirby

    Reply Reply May 13, 2020

    Well, I obviously need to soak up the last video. I can’t remember which ones Dorian/Lydian/Mixolydian are….

    I kinda already knew that IV (major) and V (major) pointed to I. I’m not sure it’s ever really helped me much in learning songs from recordings.

    Isn’t it sort of cheating, though, if you already know the chords, or at least the root chord?

  • Douglas McConnell

    Reply Reply May 31, 2020

    Good stuff, thank you!

  • Alexander

    Reply Reply June 5, 2020

    Killer lesson Griff ,
    Just such a neat way of figuring out songs. Can’t wait for the next video.
    Thank you again!
    Alexander

  • Rick Berzle

    Reply Reply July 15, 2020

    Loved it. One of the best lessons. Food for the music mind. Keep up your good work.

  • Mike

    Reply Reply July 16, 2020

    “Clear As Mud”… great band name.

  • wayne balzan

    Reply Reply July 17, 2020

    thanks again

  • Russell Eckam

    Reply Reply August 6, 2020

    Good Afternoon Griff, You are a very GOOD guitar teacher. Not just a blues guitar teacher. Music teacher using The GUITAR. You break down the music, explain TIMING (it’s everything) simplify the theory, to know the why it works sound pleasant. Slow it down show us how to do it. Just another GOOD lesson from a GOOD guitar teacher. THANK YOU Enjoy the music. Play on PEACE be well

  • Ian Haddow

    Reply Reply February 22, 2021

    Hi Griff,

    Thoroughly enjoyed these last couple of videos.
    Very simple explanation of what I’ve always thought was too complex to think about !

    I tried your technique on ’The Loner” – Gary Moore, which is very similar to your Gary Moore song in the video and ’Still got the Blues for you’.

    The other thing I found interesting is you can reverse engineer your technique and get the chords from the solo.
    I often struggle to pick out the right chords for songs by just relying on my ear. This will help tremendously.

    Thanks again.

    Ian ( from Perth, Scotland)

  • William Storey

    Reply Reply February 27, 2021

    Griff,

    In “Still got the Blues”, you stated that E chord does not belong (because its the iii chord in the key of C, but it seems to me that through the chord progression the key subtly slipped in to the key of Am (the relative minor of C). At that point, the E chord is now the V chord of the key of Am. To my ear, that E chord resolves very naturally to the Am. Then as the chord progression repeats, it subtly slipped back to the relative Major C as the key. Maybe not so subtly as the 1st chord of the progression is C Maj 7

    By the way, when I studied theory, the standard harmony rule for Major chords was expressed as ” I ii iii IV V vi vii-dim ” where capital roman numerals were Major and small roman numerals were minor. Is that not the case anymore?

  • Carlos Martinez Perez

    Reply Reply April 15, 2021

    I was thinking about Hey Joe. We have C, D, G and A (and also E). Which is the tonality then?
    Thanks for the great content.

  • Bob

    Reply Reply May 8, 2021

    Thank you sir !

  • Dom Bohbot

    Reply Reply May 15, 2021

    Hi Griff, this was a great video! I have one question about the standard harmony rule: Does it work for minor keys? That is, if a song is in A minor, are the II, III and VI chords still minor, and the IV and V still major?

    • Cheo Pace

      Reply Reply August 22, 2021

      I am a beginner with two years, trying to get to the point of intermediate – where I hope I can truly call myself a guitar player. My brain just exploded during this video. You have given me an insight I never considered. Granted, I’ll have to watch about 20 more times, but the last video along with this have opened my mind in a way that I know will boost my progress! Thanks man!!

  • Cheo Pace

    Reply Reply August 22, 2021

    I am a beginner with two years, trying to get to the point of intermediate – where I hope I can truly call myself a guitar player. My brain just exploded during this video. You have given me an insight I never considered. Granted, I’ll have to watch about 20 more times, but the last video along with this have opened my mind in a way that I know will boost my progress! Thanks man!!

  • Tom Paine

    Reply Reply January 7, 2022

    What an excellent video on sleuthing melodies…Excellent and very useful short cuts using the brain and theory rather than just the ear..Thank you….

  • Jim Cavanaugh

    Reply Reply March 19, 2022

    These last two videos have been superb. Completely eye opening. (Ear opening!) This has taken theory that is so often taught in such a complex manner and made it vey clear and concise!

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